#ATBR2019 – The Dead Girl in 2A by Carter Wilson

We’re just powering through them!

Thanks to Sourcebooks for the free copies in exchange for our honest reviews

THE DEAD GIRL IN 2A – Carter Wilson (out now!)

You can see our reviews for MISTER TENDER’S GIRL here!

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Chandra’s Thoughts: 4/5 stars

Long story short – boy meets girl on plane. Boy and girl have a weird but strong connection.  Girl tells boy she’s going to kill herself once she reaches her destination and disappears once they land.  Now what? Haha.  That’s the basics but the rest of the book is so much more intricate and for the every day thriller lover, take a slight warning that there’s some sci-fi thrown in that might surprise you as I wasn’t expecting it to go in this direction based on the synopsis alone.  HOWEVER, I love these types of genre bending (if you can even call it that completely).  GIVE ME ALL THE CRAZY.

Certain things about this book went a bit off plausibility towards the end but hell, you guys… this is fiction. And as something as crazy as where this book took me in terms of unexpectedness, screw whatever might not quite make sense because over all, this story got to me.  I didn’t even realize how invested I was in Clara and Jake until that last chapter and the ending did completely satisfy me.

What I love about Wilson and his writing is that each book that I’ve read has been completely different than the other one.  Easy, short chapters that keep you intrigued and each one has been a binge read. EACH ONE.  The direction he went in with this one is pretty wicked in terms of what people can get away with and how manipulated the world can get… even if it’s just for a small group of people.  Plus, the Author’s Note has me googling things I probably shouldn’t be! I’d recommend anything by this author.

My Thoughts: 5/5 stars

So last year I couldn’t stop raving about Carter Wilson’s book, MISTER TENDER’S GIRL, so when I saw he had another one releasing I was anxiously awaiting it. THE DEAD GIRL IN 2A was definitely different but with the same fast-paced and addictive writing style. Much like his other book, I read this one in two sittings. The short chapters coupled with the suspense and mystery of the story kept me hooked.

Have you ever had those moments where you see someone and you SWEAR you’ve met them or seen them before? There’s something familiar about them but you can’t quite place it? Jake and Clara experience this on their flight to Denver. Jake is on his way to ghostwrite for someone that is wanting their memoir published, and Clara has her own reasons for going to Denver. They experience this moment and play a version of 20 questions with each other to try and get to the bottom of it.

This encounter means more than they realize. Their paths cross again when they learn that they share a history that neither of them remembers. Sounds crazy, right? Well, let me tell you, it only gets crazier from here! I can’t really go into much more detail for fear of spoiling some twists.

Another book I’ve read, in a row, that has to do with memory. Man, these authors just want to mess with us! I love it, though. The Author’s Note in the back is definitely important to read – so don’t miss that. Memory is a fascinating thing. The small triggers we have for things we’ve long forgotten, feelings of deja vu, and so much more. The confusion these characters experience, the curiosity, the danger, it all felt so real. Wilson will remain an auto-buy author for me, and I highly recommend picking this one up if you’re wanting a binge read this summer.

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